Recent News

Great Thicket Wildlife Refuge Gets Its Start in New York

Dover, NY – Federal, state and local officials gathered today in Dover, New York, to mark the establishment of the Great Thicket National Wildlife Refuge through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s first land acquisition for the six-state refuge, the 144-acre Nellie Hill Preserve donated by The Nature Conservancy.

Volunteers Needed to Conduct Winter Rabbit Surveys in NH

DURHAM, NH – Looking for an intriguing way to spend time outdoors this winter? Wildlife biologists need help from citizen science volunteers to conduct surveys for eastern cottontail rabbits in southern New Hampshire.

Audubon Report Finds CT Birds Need Humans’ Help

By Angela Carella, Stamford Advocate

STAMFORD — Winter officially started last week, when people tend to take pity on birds and set up feeders to help them survive the biting cold.

Birds in the state could use an abundance of human compassion.

NRCS Adds New Target Species to Working Lands for Wildlife

The Working Lands for Wildlife program of the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is adding dozens of new target species to its premier wildlife conservation effort that helps agricultural producers restore and protect habitat on privately owned farms, ranches and working forests.

Connecticut Birds and New England Cottontails Linked

By the Hartford Courant

The Connecticut Audubon Society has chilling evidence of climate change: One Connecticut bird species is at risk of extinction because rising sea levels are eradicating its nesting area.

That realization, along with others in the society's 2016 Connecticut State of the Birds report, serves as yet another alarm to vast risks posed by climate change. It's a call to action that Connecticut can't afford to ignore.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Announces Great Thicket Natl. Wildlife Refuge

Nation’s Newest Wildlife Refuge Represents Coordinated Response to Conserving Key Shrubland Habitat in the Northeast

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Following an extensive public process, and with overwhelming public support, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized the creation of Great Thicket National Wildlife Refuge, dedicated to conserving and managing shrubland and young forests for wildlife in New England and eastern New York. The approval of the refuge marks a key step, enabling the Service to now work with willing and interested landowners to acquire land.

Habitat Sought for New England Cottontails in Southern ME

By Michael Kelley, Staff Writer, Scarborough Leader

Scarborough Marsh has long been a popular place for birders of all skill levels to come see nature first hand, but over the last few years biologists have been working to make sure the marsh is a favorable habitat for a four-legged animal that is becoming endangered in this state.

Canton Land Trust Joins NEC Initiative in CT, Offers Educational Hike

By John Fitts, Canton Compass

CANTON, CT – With rabbit sightings so common in the area one might question the need to improve habitat.

Conservationists, however, will be quick to tell you that those cute little bunnies you see are almost certainly eastern cottontails, a species introduced from the Midwest in the nineteenth century, primarily for hunting.

Sustainable Timber Harvests: "This is What Conservation Looks Like"

By Lee Burnett, Portland Press Herald

Rabbits and songbirds can join us as the beneficiaries of responsible logging operations.

SPRINGVALE, ME — When Saco Valley Land Trust conducted a timber harvest on some of its property in Biddeford last winter, the trust faced an issue unheard-of in logging country – the suburban sensibilities of neighbors.

"We got complaints," said Richard Rhames, a vegetable farmer and president of the land trust. "We heard things like 'Boy, they made a mess in there.'"

Fragmented Forest Equals Less Management

By Adam Downing, Virginia Cooperative Extension, in Fall 2016 Virginia Forest Landowner Update

"The Fragmented Forest."

Those words carry negative undertones. Perhaps I should’ve chosen a different title like "Forest Bits & Pieces" or "Checkerboard Forestry" which sound more like an environmentally friendly candy or a board game. Aside from the undertones of the phrase, the fact is that forest fragmentation has both positive and negative consequences.

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