Recent News

Ruffed Grouse Sighting a Pleasant Surprise

By Bill Reid for the Norwich Bulletin

This past March I was hiking through a forest that had recently gone through an extensive timber harvest.

Most of what foresters refer to as the overstory, composed of dominant, mature white pine, had been harvested to make way for younger and mid-sized deciduous oaks, maples, pines and birch trees.

Planned Fires Help Cape Cod Forests, Wildlife

By Chris Lindahl for the Cape Cod Times

MASHPEE — As firefighters on Tuesday prepared to set part of the forest ablaze off Red Brook Road, they had to check the weather.

Final Sparta Mountain Plan (NJ) Met With Concerns

By Erika Norton for the Sparta Independent


Tree harvest plans:
322 acres managed to accelerate old-growth characteristics (single-tree selection cutting)
100 acres shelterwood cutting
208 acres managed for young forest characteristics (modified tree seed cutting)

Source: New Jersey DEP

Fire Sparks New Life on an Old Farm

Central Massachusetts Land Trust Helps Wildlife

When the East Quabbin Land Trust bought the 90-acre Frohloff Farm, near Ware, the farm hadn't been managed as farmland in many years. Invasive species like glossy buckthorn, multiflora rose, bittersweet and honeysuckle were taking over.

Controlled Burns Restore Habitat, Reduce Tick Numbers

By Mike Barcaskey for the Beaver County Times

While it’s an old tool of nature, controlled burns are more popular than ever with wildlife-management groups, and the Pennsylvania Game Commission is no exception.

This spring, the Game Commission will be conducting controlled burns to restore wildlife habitat and decrease the threat of wildfires on State Game Lands statewide.

What Can Congress Learn from Teddy Bear and Peter Rabbit?

By Eric Holst, Environmental Defense Fund, Opinion Contributor for The Hill

This week, several Senate Republicans initiated efforts to reform the Endangered Species Act in ways that would roll back critical protections for wildlife, putting countless plants and animals at greater risk of extinction. It’s one of many anticipated actions to review the law, a number of which are likely to propose weakening the Act in order to streamline development and reduce regulatory burdens on private landowners.

Mashpee Refuge a "Bright Spot" for Native Cottontails, Bats

By Sam Houghton, Mashpee Enterprise

Mashpee, MA – The Mashpee National Wildlife Refuge continues to be a rare bright spot for two species: the Northern long-eared bat and the New England cottontail. And the management of the refuge may have helped with their survival.

That was the message from a talk at Waquoit Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve on Monday, April 17, entitled “Bats & Bunnies: Managing Habitat for Seldom Seen Mammals.”

CT Cottontail Conservationists Expand Focus to All Young Forest Wildlife

By Andrea Petrullo, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP)

USDA, Partners to Invest Millions in Large-Scale, Targeted Conservation Projects

New Hampshire leads $5.2 million regional Young Forest Initiative For At-Risk Species, including the New England cottontail.


Why We Should Be Cutting More Trees

By Joe Smith for Cool Green Science

Throughout their lives and even within a single day, American Woodcock are citizens of many habitats.

By day they forage in forest, probing the soft soil with their bill in search of worms and insects.

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